Thursday, October 16, 2014

Sara J. Henry joins Team Detectives Beyond Borders for Bouchercon 2014 panel

Sara J. Henry has joined the "Beyond Hammett, Chandler, and Spillane: Lesser Known Writers of the Pulp and Paperback Eras" panel that I'll moderate at Bouchercon 2014 in Long Beach, Calif.

Sara is the author of the novels Learning to Swim and A Cold and Lonely Place, the latter of which will be up for the best-novel Anthony Award at Bouchercon. For my panel, she'll discuss Lester Dent, the prolific principal author of Doc Savage, with a few remarks about Charlotte Armstrong, whose A Dram of Poison won the best-novel Edgar Award in 1957.

I met Sara at Bouchercon 2008 in Baltimore, where she made her first big crime-fiction splash when everyone but me mistook her for Sarah Weinman. That's why I'm especially tickled that Sarah Weinman will also be on the panel. (Get a sneak peak at Sara and Sarah here, and see what all the confusion was about.)
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Beyond Hammett, Chandler, and Spillane: Lesser Known Writers of the Pulp and Paperback Eras happens at 3 p.m., Friday, Nov. 14, at the Hyatt Regency, Long Beach. Not everyone on the panel is named Sara or Sarah, spent formative years in Ontario, or is haunted by a crime-fiction doppelganger. Max Allan Collins, Charles Kelly, and Gary Phillips will also take part. 

© Peter Rozovsky 2014

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5 Comments:

Blogger RT said...

As an "oh, by the way" comment, I hope David Goodis gets some attention in your panel discussions. As Mystery Scene notes this month, "Few genre writers make the journey from bus-station paperback racks to the acid-free pages of the Library of America. David Goodis made the leap in 2012." My reading of Goodis convinces me he is a perfect fit for your panel. But, hey, I could be wrong.

October 17, 2014  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

I don’t know if Goodis will come up in that discussion; he’s a lot less obscure than some of the writers who will be discussed. But two weeks before Noircon, I will attend a convention that started its life as Goodiscon. Goodis influence persists, not least in the convention’s logo.

October 17, 2014  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

Here are spome of my posts about David Goodis, including one about the Philadelphia launch of that Library of America volume.

October 17, 2014  
Blogger RT said...

Thank you for sharing the previous postings and links. As for Goodis, I encourage you to check out the article in this month's Mystery Scene magazine. I am on the verge of ordering the LOA omnibus because of the article.

October 17, 2014  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

Thanks. I have the Goodis book and a number of other LOA volumes. Those books are a pleasure to hold and read, and a technological marvel. How the devil do they get so many pages in such those books? How do they manage to make the paper so thin, yet so sturdy?

October 17, 2014  

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