Thursday, April 29, 2010

Edgars beyond borders: Awards night

The 2010 Edgar ceremony begins in about twenty minutes. Here's a post I made in January about two beyond-borders nominees for the top U.S. crime fiction prizes. And here's a link to all nominees at the Mystery Writers of America Web site. Good luck and congratulations to all.

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Nominees for the 2010 Edgar Awards include two beyond-borders books previously discussed here: Jo Nesbø's Nemesis, translated by Don Bartlett, for best novel, and L.C. Tyler's The Herring-Seller's Apprentice, for best paperback original.

Here's part of what I wrote about Nemesis last year:

"Nemesis may be Jo Nesbø's best novel, more tightly constructed, sticking more closely to its central story than his others, with only hints of the flashbacks that are such an integral part of The Redbreast. It muses philosophically but unobtrusively on revenge both personal and national and, as usual with Nesbø, it contains wonderful deadpan humor."
Tyler surprised me at Crime Fest 2009 when he said he admired Allan Guthrie – unexpected for a self-described author of comic cozy mysteries. The Herring-Seller's Apprentice sparked much lively discussion on this blog, including a quiz for which Tyler graciously offered a copy of his follow-up novel, Ten Little Herrings, as a prize. (Revisit that discussion here.)

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Winners here.

© Peter Rozovsky 2010

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14 Comments:

Blogger seana said...

I have to say that that Edgars list makes me feel very remiss.

January 26, 2010  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

The International Dagger list in the UK is the one that generally leaves me feeling remiss. These lists, on the other hand, had me feeling good about things, as I'd read both beyond-borders books on them. Now I'll go back to see if I missed anything.

January 26, 2010  
Anonymous kathy d. said...

Well, I read three of the nominated books: The Odds, which I thought was very good; A Bad Day for Sorry; and Black Water Rising.

Actually, they were all good reads and all quite original.

Yes, the International Dagger list is intimidating. Maxine Clarke has a post about it at Petrona and I think I'd read only one on her list.

April 30, 2010  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

Thanks for pointing me to that post. The International Dagger has a new set of judges this year. For the first time in the award's five-year history, the winner may be from a country other than France.

April 30, 2010  
Anonymous kathy d. said...

You mean my favorite French writer Vargas?

Interesting books in the Mysterious Bookshop's April newsletter posted at their website.

April 30, 2010  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

Vargas (and translator Sian Reynolds) last year, three years ago and four years ago; Dominique Manotti (and translators Amanda Hopkinson and Ros Schwartz) for the excellent Lorraine Connection in 2008.

I interviewed Vargas’ translator on Detectives Beyond Borders two years ago, if you’d care to take a look.

Thanks for the heads-up on the Mysterious Bookshop newsletter.

April 30, 2010  
Anonymous kathy d. said...

I will look at the article on Sian Reynolds.

I did read an interview with that translator online last year. Learning how each phrase was figured out, how idioms translate and will they be figured out like England's English or U.S. English, etc.

April 30, 2010  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

will they be figured out like England's English or U.S. English, etc.

If I have some extra time on my hands one day, I might compare U.S. and English editions of a translated crime novel to see if there are differences. I do know of cases where American translators have been unhappy with changes made by British publishers.

April 30, 2010  
Blogger seana said...

Well, the winners have been announced. I think in any of these award type situations, the best period is when the 'short list' has been announced. It's generally a round up of some of the quality stuff that's been done in the year--though certainly not all. Once the winner is chosen, interest recedes in the others, which I think is often unfortunate.

April 30, 2010  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

I suspect you're right about this. I am also wary of the suggestion that one book is the best in a given year.

You mentioned the possibility of adding Ghosts of Belfast to a display of award winners. Do you also put up displays of short-listed books? Will you keep them up even after a winner is announced? How about other bookstores? What is their practice in these matters?

April 30, 2010  
Blogger seana said...

Yes, many of the shortlisted books are up, as is Stuart's. The awards shelves are not really my domain, so I don't know what will happen now as there are a lot of prizes in many fields this time of year. But I'll definitely make note of them in the regular mystery section. The winners in the best first novel and best paperback originals were from small presses that we hadn't ordered from, though I expect we'll get them in now.

April 30, 2010  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

The winners in the best first novel and best paperback originals were from small presses that we hadn't ordered from, though I expect we'll get them in now.

And that's an agrument in favor of awards and short lists.

April 30, 2010  
Blogger Photographe à Dublin said...

Have just found your blog via Crimesceneni.

Shall continue to read with interest.

May 01, 2010  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

Merci et bienvenue.

May 01, 2010  

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