Sunday, April 25, 2010

Posts and outposts

Welcome to the Gutter
Crime Always Pays brings the happy news of a new crime-friendly bookstore in Dublin. The Gutter Bookshop, conveniently situated in the happening Temple Bar district, has hosted or will host the likes of John Connolly, Arlene Hunt and Colin Bateman. Give store owner Bob Johnstone a round of applause, and give the store lots of support and money.

Out of the frying pan and into the Shrier
Former Noir at the Bar star Howard Shrier is up for Canada's best-novel Arthur Ellis Award for High Chicago. Shrier won the best-first-novel award last year for Buffalo Jump.

High five for Ghosts
Finally, Stuart Neville's criminally neglected debut novel, Ghosts of Belfast (called The Twelve in the UK, where the name Belfast apparently makes folks shuffle awkwardly and stare at the floor), has won a Los Angeles Times Book Prize in the mystery/thriller category. Well done, Irish Stu.

© Peter Rozovsky 2010

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12 Comments:

Blogger Dana King said...

And here I am with both on my TBR pile; HIGH CHICAGO is actually close to the top.

Sweet.

April 25, 2010  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

Howard Shrier has been at the last two Bouchercons. I didn't hear him on any panels, but I did eat breakfast with him one day in Baltimore, and stop me if you've heard this before.

It turns out we went to the same high school and even crossed paths for a year (he's three years older). John McFetridge and Declan Burke were at the breakfast, too, and poor Declan had to listen to three Montreal guys talking about bagels. (That Montreal bagels are the best in the world is a fact established beyond argument.)

April 25, 2010  
Anonymous kathy d. said...

No, no, Murray's bagels in the Big Apple are the best. And H&H on the Upper West Side in New York.

And I'm leaving out the Lower East Side with many excellent bagels.

April 25, 2010  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

There's nothing wrong with H&H bagels. They're just not Montreal bagels. I'd be happy for recommendations of bagel places on the Lower East Side, though.

April 25, 2010  
Blogger seana said...

Great news for Stuart. I'll be sure to put Ghosts of Belfast on our awards display tomorrow. He's really on a roll, isn't he?

April 25, 2010  
Anonymous marco said...

John McFetridge and Declan Burke were at the breakfast, too, and poor Declan had to listen to three Montreal guys talking about bagels.

A Canadian 1-2-3!
Here's mine:

1)"The zombies were like Canadians, in that they looked enough like real people at first, to fool you. "

2)"A deputy checked and found the people were not suspicious, but merely Canadian."

3)"Canadian as a beaver made out of maple syrup"

April 26, 2010  
Anonymous marco said...

That Montreal bagels are the best in the world is a fact established beyond argument.

YES WORLD’S BEST BAGELS ARE ITALIAN

April 26, 2010  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

Seana, what he's on is the definition of a roll. And it's good to think of a crime novel getting prominent display.

April 26, 2010  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

Marco, number two tops my personal list.

April 26, 2010  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

marco has left a new comment on your post "Posts and outposts":

YES WORLD’S BEST BAGELS ARE ITALIAN


From rolls to bagels. I am pleased to see that Italian bagels topped the league table in Serie B.

April 26, 2010  
Anonymous marco said...

I am pleased to see that Italian bagels topped the league table in Serie B.


Well, everything which comes from your Continent is indeed gastronomic second division, but there are also true Jewish-Italian bagels, and by virtue of being made by Italian pasticcerie they probably can't help being better than those in Montreal or New York.
Not to mention that we have countless regional varieties of ciambelle, some of which are probably closer to bagels than to donuts.

April 26, 2010  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

Well, everything which comes from your Continent is indeed gastronomic second division

The salient point is not whether Montreal bagels are better than New York or any other bagels, but rather that they are of a different order of creation -- or, more prosaically, are prepared to a slightly different recipe. I don't think it's a matter of New York bagel bakers and Montreal bagel bakers trying the same thing and the New Yorkers falling short.

A bagel from an Italian pasticceria would have made a fine accompaniment for the Italian klezmer band I saw in Rome in 1997. And here's a bit of bagel history including varieties of bagels from around the world. You see what great lengths I go to in the pursuit of learning?

April 26, 2010  

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