Wednesday, September 26, 2007

Welcome, Inquirer readers

Today is a proud day for Detectives Beyond Borders, the blog for international crime fiction: DBB is now linked to the online edition of The Philadelphia Inquirer. (You'll find the link on the newspaper's Blogs & Columns page.)

I like to think of this as a clever and productive way for the Inquirer to take advantage of its staff's latent talents and to offer readers material for which there is insufficient space in the newspaper. I hope Inquirer readers will find it a diverting place to learn about and discuss crime writing and crime writers from around the world.

If you've found this link via the Inquirer, welcome for the first of what I hope will be many visits. Stick with me, and you'll learn about crime writers like Algeria's Yasmina Khadra, France's fantastic Fred Vargas, Ireland's Declan Burke and England's well-known William Shakespeare. You'll take flight with Adrian Hyland's Diamond Dove from Australia, and you'll find out why people keep winding up dead under trains in postwar Japanese crime fiction.

We'll discuss issues in international crime fiction, including strategies of translation, and you'll learn what crime-fiction fans in other countries read. You'll also get to chat with an interesting, knowledgeable and friendly group of readers from around the world, and, if you'd like, to practice your French, Italian, German, Spanish and maybe even Finnish.

Welcome. And now, start reading!

© Peter Rozovsky 2007

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13 Comments:

Anonymous Lars@Krimi-Couch.de said...

Congratulations, Peter - keep on your great work! Just to show how international this blog is: Herzlichen Glückwünsch ;-)

September 26, 2007  
Blogger Peter said...

Danke für die freundlichen Wünsche und für die deutsche Lektion!

September 26, 2007  
Anonymous KarenC said...

Practice my anything other than ragged English - now I feel somewhat inadequate. Perhaps I could offer a translation service for Australian English?

Seriously though - well done on the possibility of increased readership - it's great fun to see where this blog goes on a daily basis.

Incidentally http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/S%C3%A9bastien_Japrisot - I'm reading the 10.30 From Marseille at the moment - for something at the very other end of the spectrum from Vargas - it's great fun.

September 26, 2007  
Blogger Peter said...

Weren't you the person who told meabout the occasional revolting practice of publishers' "translating" Australian slang for books published elsewhere in the English-speaking world? And I did post a link to some typically funny exasperation from Shane Maloney about a publisher who wanted to change footpath to sidewalk for an American edition of one of his books. So a translation service for Australian English may not be as outlandish as you think.

Thanks for the kind words. I hope the new link will drive readership up both for me and for the paper.

I had the idea that Japrisot went in for slow, leisurely storytelling more somber than Vargas'. Was I imagining that? Yikes, and Audrey Tautou was in the movie version of A Very Long Engagement. Was that one of the "cute" roles that I mentioned in passing in my comment?

September 26, 2007  
Anonymous KarenC said...

It was indeed me - but then we're now dealing with an EAGLE or some such lunacy on the cover of DIAMOND DOVE (which has been renamed MOONLIGHT DOWNS) so the insanity presses on.

I'm not sure that I'd call the Japrisot book I'm reading at the moment slow and leisurely. It's got quite an odd but engaging style - sort of delivered staccato - almost pulp style maybe (goodness knows I'm not good at this comparison stuff). I've not seen the movie I must admit and I only just accidentally fell across a couple of these books in a secondhand bookshop (what we call a UBS - see there's a translation for you :) ) recently - so it's interesting to try somebody completely new for me.

September 26, 2007  
Blogger Peter said...

Seeing Japrisot's and Vargas' names together set off a spark. I think I have one of Japrisot's books lying around. I may take a look; thanks for that link you posted.

I wonder if the Diamond Dove cover issue relates to cultural differences or the fear thereof. The title was changed for the pedestrian reason that the U.S. publisher feared confusion with some its other titles. I don't know where the eagle or other non-dove bird comes from, though, except for the possibility that Soho wanted to emphasize some of the book's darker elements.

I always thought a UBS was one of the ports on a computer. In fact, though, we call used bookstores used bookstores here, store being more frequent than shop. I'd never seen the term UBS for one of them, though.

September 26, 2007  
Anonymous KarenC said...

Oh great - my husband already thinks I'm a techno-idiot - UBS instead of USB will just about bury any credibility I've got left [VBEG]

I think I picked up UBS from one of my online reading groups - don't tell me we're going to need inter-language group translations as well - I'll be in bed with the doona pulled over my head until further notice :) :) :)

September 27, 2007  
Blogger Peter said...

Oh, yeah. The thing on the computer is a USB port and not a UBS.

You know, I had this stuff down before you confused me.

What's a doona?

September 27, 2007  
Blogger Uriah Robinson said...

Well done Peter. How does it feel to become one of the establishment?

September 27, 2007  
Blogger Peter said...

Thanks. I suppose now I'll have to stop condemning the out-of-touch mainstream media and start writing panic-stricken screeds about the hyper-democratic threat that blogs pose to civilization.

September 27, 2007  
Blogger Linkmeister said...

Nonsense. The MSM has so many strands to it that you can condemn portions (thus maintaining your blogger cred; I suggest starting with sportswriters) even as you succumb to some of its unholy blandishments. ;)

September 27, 2007  
Anonymous Maxine said...

Well done, Peter. May your traffic continue to rise exponentially -- which indeed it should do as more people discover your consistently interesting and stimulating blog.

September 27, 2007  
Blogger Peter said...

The condemnations of the MSM are brainless, and those of the blogosphere reek of fear and panic.

And now I have said all I will say on that cacophonous and uninteresting topic. I spend enough time condemning sportswriters in my professional life; no need to do it here, too.

May your traffic continue to rise exponentially

What a lovely, solemn ring that has. Thanks!

September 27, 2007  

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