Saturday, October 13, 2012

Upcoming books from McKinty, Neville

I've begun my post-Bouchercon reading with early looks at upcoming novels by two of the finest writers from the world's most vital crime fiction scene: Northern Ireland.

Suffice it to say that few authors begin a chapter with the punch that Stuart Neville does, and that Adrian McKinty's Sean Duffy novels (I Hear the Sirens in the Street will follow on the current, excellent Cold Cold Ground) are affecting, intelligent and entertaining stories that just happen to be about police investigating crimes.

Like its predecessor, Sirens is a serious portrait of one man's progress through troubled times (early-1980s Belfast and Carrickfergus, the author's home town). Like The Cold Cold Ground, it feels organic. Every joke, every grim encounter, or musing on the crappy Irish weather, or setback or advance in the police investigation contains the seeds of the whole. And it's a hell of a whole; these books are as smart and fun and harrowing as crime fiction gets.

© Peter Rozovsky 2012

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13 Comments:

Blogger seana graham said...

I'm up to speed with McKinty, but a little behind with Neville. Can't wait to catch up!

Although right now I'm reading Slaughter's Hound by Declan Burke, so it may be awhile, considering that I'm also supposed to be reading some other things besides Irish crime fiction.

October 13, 2012  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

I, too, should be reading some other things besides Irish crime fiction, but they will just have to wait.

October 13, 2012  
Blogger seana graham said...

If you have to choose, it's a good way to go.

October 13, 2012  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

I also want to read Disappeared, by Anthony Quinn, not the actor, but a first-time criem writer from -- yep -- Country Tyrone, Northern Ireland.

October 13, 2012  
Blogger seana graham said...

I have noticed his name, either here or on Declan's blog, because of course it's the kind of name you'd do a doubletake on.

October 13, 2012  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

Breaking plates, yes. Writing crime novels? He ought to call himself Zorba the Crimewriter.

October 13, 2012  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

I had to set the book aside momentarily for Bouchercon, but its first few chapters are eerie and atmospheric, a distant relatie to The Ghosts of Belfast, perhaps.

October 13, 2012  
Blogger adrian mckinty said...

Peter

I read both of these the same week too.

October 15, 2012  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

Well, you wrote one of them, so you win on a tiebreaker.

October 15, 2012  
Blogger Anthony Quinn said...

Thanks Peter for the Zorba the Crimewriter line. I enjoy reading your blog from time to time and had a hearty chuckle at that one.
Incidentally, my parents tell me I was christened Anthony after the saint, rather than the actor - but I haven't let that hold me back. Hope you find the time to read Disappeared. Ken Bruen has praised it in his typical madcap fashion - see more at www.mysteriouspress.com.

Anthony Quinn

October 20, 2012  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

You're welcome. I read Ken Bruen's poetic praise of Disappeared, but I think I heard about it first, as I have with so many Irish crime writers, from Declan Burke.

Hmm, I see that St. Anthony of Padua was the patron of lost things and missing persons, and I know St. Anthony Abbot was tortured by demons. Either would make a good patron for a crime writer.

I am buried under deadlines at the moment, but Disappeared is at the very top of my TBR list.

P.S. I was once in the Sperrin Mountains on my way to see the Beaghmore Stone Circles and stone rows. The day was cold and rainy, so I stopped in Cookstown to buy an extra pair of socks.

October 20, 2012  
Blogger Anthony Quinn said...

That simple sentence describing your time in Tyrone bulges with hidden significance. Worthy of Henning Mankell at his best.

October 20, 2012  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

"The day was cold and rainy, so I stopped in Cookstown to buy an extra pair of socks."

That sounds like the sentence from which one of those flash-fiction challenges flows, doesn't it? Thanks for the encouragement. Ancient monuments and men's hosiery are a winning combination.

October 20, 2012  

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