Tuesday, April 28, 2009

Who is eating the Watchmen?

I've posted a few times in recent months about the comic and movie Watchmen. Those posts were the main course. Here, courtesy of the Baixa Gastronomia blog, is the dessert, a chocolate cake with yellow icing, a chocolate smile and a blood stain of strawberry sauce, in the manner of Watchmen's signature blood-streaked smiley face.

Click on the Baixa link for the recipe. It's in Catalan, but you'll figure it out. Blogger Mar Calpena provides a synopsis in English. (Hat tip to Briciole, for its continuing mix of crime fiction, food and Italian lessons.)

Now it's your turn. What foods suit your favorite crime writers?

© Peter Rozovsky 2009

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30 Comments:

Blogger Loren Eaton said...

Liver. With fava beans and a nice bottle of Chianti, of course.

April 28, 2009  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

And what authors go best with each course?

April 28, 2009  
Blogger R. T. said...

Do you suppose it is possible to cook falcon in such a way that it looks and tastes like chicken? Perhaps a Maltese restaurant chef would be willing to share a recipe.

Sorry, but that's the best I could do on short notice without much thought.

Do I really need to name the author?

P.S. Perhaps a nice Greek wine would go well with it. And, of course, you need a little SF sourdough bread.

April 28, 2009  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

With Malteasers for dessert.

A basket of sourdough would no very nicely. The Greek wine for Joel Cairo and Casper Guttman?

April 28, 2009  
Blogger R. T. said...

Okay, I'm too lazy to dig the book off the shelf, so someone refresh my memory: Wasn't the ship in Hammett's novel a Greek registry freighter? Or was the captain Greek? Or am I thoroughly besotted in my advanced years?

April 28, 2009  
Blogger R. T. said...

Well, if that doesn't work, how about some Irish whiskey in honor of Bridget (assuming we're still talking about Hammett's novel)?

April 28, 2009  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

It's been a little while since I've read the book or seen the movie, but both were so full of shady and duplicitous characters that any could have been playing at being a Greek. So bring on the retsina, Gus.

April 28, 2009  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

I found several references that said Joel Cairo was Greek, and so was Effie Perrine, according to this interview with Joe Gores on what looks like an interesting Hammett Web site.

April 28, 2009  
Blogger Linkmeister said...

Well, let's see. Saucisse minuit for Wolfe/Stout, of course. Either spanakopita or Hungarian goulash for Eric Ambler. Cucumber sandwiches for Dame Agatha (she could share them with Dorothy Sayers). Rare steak for John D. MacDonald/McGee. Fry bread for Hillerman, Leaphorn and Chee. Venison steaks for Nevada Barr/Anna Pigeon.

Holmes is a puzzle. Bread and the leftover Sunday joint?

April 29, 2009  
Blogger Loren Eaton said...

Peter,

Thomas Harris. If I can catch him.

April 29, 2009  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

I'm not sure Nero Wolfe would eat a meal prepared by anyone other than Fritz Brenner. Maybe I'd just offer him some very good beer.

Lamb for Dame Ngaio, perhaps?

April 29, 2009  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

I didn't think when I asked this question that I might be set to planning a menu for Hannibal Lecter's creator. That's a challenge for the most sensitive host.

April 29, 2009  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I'm pretty sure Saul Panzer managed to tickle Nero's delectable palate with some nibbles when Nero was on the lam from a courtcase.
I cannot read an Elvis Cole novel without drooling over vension sausages grilled over smokey coal and washed down with ice cold beer straight from the bottle, mmmmmmmmmmm.
*is drooling mess*
Arlene

April 29, 2009  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

*Patting your chin discreetly with a linen napkin*

Saul Panzer is a ten-dollar-an-hour man, and he's worth twenty, so such service from him would not be a shock.

I've read just one Elvis Cole novel, and I don't remember much in the way of food, except possibly a trip to a Japanese restaurant. But that menu sets my heart a-bubbling.

April 29, 2009  
Blogger Linkmeister said...

Saul did indeed do that. Archie said he was showing off.

April 29, 2009  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

I would expect Archie to have contemplated suggesting a street-corner hot dog just to see Wolfe's reaction.

April 29, 2009  
Blogger Linkmeister said...

Now that's interesting, Peter. I don't think a street vendor appears anywhere in the Wolfe stories. Was NYC that much different in the 40s and 50s, I wonder, or did Stout just enjoy having Archie always try to make it home for Fritz's lunches? AG often appears in diners eating pie, but I don't recall a grab n' go hot dog or pretzel at all.

April 30, 2009  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

I don't remember any street vendors in the Nero Wolfe stories either, but I couldn't suggest that Archie propose taking Nero to Coney Island for a hot dog. That would be beyond the pale.

April 30, 2009  
Blogger adrian mckinty said...

I've always associated Jim Thompson with banana cream pie. It seems very 50's diner to me.

April 30, 2009  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

Ah, now there's a fine association, all the richer for being so unexpected. Too bad I'm giving away no prizes on this one.

April 30, 2009  
Blogger adrian mckinty said...

Hey do you want to hear a funny-ish story. I grew up watching Happy Days in Northern Ireland in the 70's. Now the US TV imports we got back then were all jumbled up: shows like Rawhide, Bonaza, The Lucy Show etc. so until about 1994 I thought that Happy Days was a period show, i.e. that it was filmed in the 1950's. I remember saying to my American girlfriend once about Henry Winkler "My God he's aged well" and she wasn't shocked at all.

April 30, 2009  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

I imagine that sort of temporal dislocation can induce headaches. I know about the worldwide reach of American popular culture, but the thought of Irish youth watching "Happy Days" is jarring nonetheless.

April 30, 2009  
Blogger marco said...

And the thought of Italian youth watching Happy Days? (Or Mork & Mindy, or The Jeffersons, or Diff'rent Strokes, or or or...)

April 30, 2009  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

Equally weird, though the thought of Fonzie and the Troubles in the same cultural universe has an odd charge all its own.

April 30, 2009  
Blogger Linkmeister said...

Works both ways, though. Fawlty Towers? Upstairs, Downstairs? Are You Being Served? Yes, Minister? Ab Fab?

Why, no, I don't watch PBS at all.

April 30, 2009  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

That's true. Except that when Americans watch British imports, they're elevating themselves, and when Europeans watch American imports, they're debasing themselves with culturally imperialistic trash. Go figure.

April 30, 2009  
Blogger adrian mckinty said...

have you ever seen this wheezer video. Apparently everyone agreed to give their permission except for Potsy who felt it cheapened his art. Eventually he was persuaded by Ron Howard who was a fan of Spike Joynze's work.

April 30, 2009  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

And the art of Potsy is not to be trifled with. Your comment makes me feel good about Ron Howard after all those movies he's made that I don't have much interest in seeing.

April 30, 2009  
Blogger adrian mckinty said...

I feel the same way about Ron Howard although its hard to judge from 2 films Apollo 13 and Frost/Nixon.

May 01, 2009  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

I think that video is kind of silly, but it is decidedly cool that Ron Howard persuaded Potsie (most grating name I can think of a character on a hit TV show) to forsake artistic considerations. Cool is not part of what critics and the public generally think about him, which is why this is interesting news.

May 01, 2009  

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