Monday, November 10, 2014

Sheep's head revisited: A Bouchercon memory

Photo by the late Leighton Gage.
 Appalling food item courtesy 
of Yrsa Sigurðardóttir.
  My bags are packed, I'm ready to go, but the taxi won't be blowing its horn until Wednesday.

As I eagerly await my flight to Bouchercon 2014 in Long Beach, bursting with jealousy of friends who are already there, here's a photo from Bouchercon 2009 in Indianapolis. I post it just so I can use the headline again.

© Peter Rozovsky 2014

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6 Comments:

Blogger R.T. said...

Your photo and posting remind me of my near-death experience in Iceland (1981): I was confronted by a roasted sheep's head at a NATO dinner. I had to figure out how to nibble (so I would not offend) without becoming offensively ill. What a memory! Thanks, Peter. Thanks at lot!

Of course, the "hot dogs" made of lamb and mutton (widely available at Iceland "fast food" sites) were quite good. It proves that almost anything can be converted into an edible "hot dog." I think they were called "pilzers," but I might be misremembering the English version of the Icelandic word. Yum!

November 10, 2014  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

Yrsa also brought hákarl to one convention. I think one person claimed to like it. I did not believe him.

I also once ate something sold under the name of "hot dog" at Tokyo Narita Airport. It was awful, though I did enjoy watching a Yomiuri Giants game on television with my fellow travelers.

November 10, 2014  
Blogger R.T. said...

I did not experience hakarl. I have an aversion to seafood of any kind -- especially smoked, dried, fermented, and awful varieties (hakarl).

Of course, Icelanders have a long tradition of having to make do with what is available. But old traditions there are fading away. So I suspect your Icelandic friend is simply screwing with you when she shows up with those gourmet delights.

November 10, 2014  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

Without a doubt. She has a lively sense of fun, and I have accused her of trying to fool us into believing Icelanders really eat this stuff.

The first time I looked up hákarl, I was delighted by a delicate reference of "not all Icelanders like it."

November 10, 2014  
Blogger R.T. said...

So many countries have bizarre (inedible) foods, and when I traveled around the world (Iceland, Philippines, Kenya, Australia, Scotland, etc.) I have avoided anything that did not look, sound, or smell sensible. But I wonder: is America known for any bizarre food? After a few seconds of thought, I cannot think of any singular (i.e., inedible) American food (unless Rocky Mountain Oysters are unique to America, which I doubt). If there is such a food, you need to be prepared when you next encounter your Icelandic friend.

November 10, 2014  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

It appears she won't attend Bouchercon this year. Too bad; I looked forward to the challenge of making up some appalling but non-existent food.

November 10, 2014  

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