Saturday, May 03, 2014

Mystery training with the MWA in Philly

Not much has happened in Philadelphia since Thomas Jefferson left town, but that will change on Saturday, June 28, when the Mystery Writers of America come to town with MWA University—Philadelphia, a full-day writing workshop with the experts for just about anybody.

Teacher/leaders include Hallie Ephron, Reed Farrel Coleman, Edgar winner Daniel Stashower, and more, and topics include everything from turning an idea into a story to the business of writing. The cost is low, just $50 for MWA members, $75 for non-members, with $25 deducted from the membership fee for those who join within 30 days of the event, and the price includes lunch.

This one looks so good that I might even sign up myself.

© Peter Rozovsky 2014  

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13 Comments:

Blogger seana graham said...

Do it. You're bound to have a good time, whatever else.

May 03, 2014  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

Well, it would mean having to get up awfully early.

In fact, I had just today had one of my periodic ideas that I wondered if I might be able to make into a story. I'm also reading Reed Farrel Coleman's latest book, and I noticed at least one little strategy he uses to build suspense. So I've been thinking about the mechanics by which a brilliant idea turns into a story.

May 03, 2014  
Blogger seana graham said...

Sounds like a green light to me.

May 03, 2014  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

I even have some time off work then, so I can work myself up gradually to the agony of having to get up so early.

May 03, 2014  
Blogger seana graham said...

One day of early rising won't kill you. I think.

May 03, 2014  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

Yep, like I used tell the kids when I was a summer-cap counselor when they wouldn't keep quiet and go to sleep at night: "YOU DON'T COME TO CAMP TO HAVE FUN!"

May 03, 2014  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

Besides, the last time I noted my dread at the prospect of having to get up early (Bouchercon 2013 in Albany), by God, I got up early.

May 04, 2014  
Blogger seana graham said...

Just think of it as staying up all night.

May 04, 2014  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

No, I'll make it one of those special times. People who get up in the morning every day don't always appreciate what a novel experience it can be. I'll just work like a boxer in training for a fight, going to bed a little earlier each night, getting up a little earlier each day building toward the big event. If I go to this thing, I'll want to be alert and awake.

May 04, 2014  
Blogger RT said...

Well, "when Jefferson left" means what? Let me see. He was VP to John Adams. Neither he nor Adams spent the majority of their time in Philadelphia when it was the capital; Jefferson preferred Virginia, and Adams preferred his Boston suburb. Then the capital moved to Washington DC, and by then Jefferson and Adams were at each other's throats (i.e., the beginning of bitter, party politics) until a reconciliation a decade or so later (after Jefferson's turn at the helm).

May 05, 2014  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

He was secretary of state 1790-1794, his office on the site now occupied by the building in which my company rents space.

May 05, 2014  
Blogger RT said...

Well, I just finished reading David McCullough's biography of John Adams, so my tidbits about Jefferson are recent and limited; I must have glossed over the office location. BTW, in the early years of the country, a person's position as Secretary of State was nearly a guarantee of his eventual presidency. I have no comment about whether or not that would now be a good source for presidents. Perhaps my next reading adventure should be a Jefferson biography. I've been through Washington and Adams. Logically, the red-headed slave owner is next.

May 05, 2014  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

The traffic seems to be in the other direction these days: defeated presidential candidates become secretary of state.

Jefferson is, of course, not associated with Philadelphia, but he did write the Declaration of Independence a block away, at Seventh and Market Streets (though Market was then called High Street). But if I could install myself at Monticello, I'm not sure I'd spend much time here, either.

May 05, 2014  

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