Monday, March 04, 2013

The real star of El Dorado

7 Comments:

Blogger Roman Noir said...

I've always wanted to read "No Good from a Corpse", maybe I'll get lucky and it will be reissued through the feminist press http://www.feministpress.org/books/fp-series/femmes-fatales
I haven't seen El Dorado but my favorite Mitchum Western is River of No Return with miss Marilyn Monroe! They lay the standard noir dialogue on pretty thick!

March 05, 2013  
Blogger Solea said...

I've always wanted to read "No Good From a Corpse"! Maybe I'll get lucky and Feminist Press out of NY City University will reissue as part of their femme fatale series. I haven't seen El Dorado but my favorite Mitchum Western is The River of No Return with Miss Marilyn Monroe! It's full of over the top "standard noir" dialogue and bad rear projection, but I love Miss Monroe's and Mitchum's singing...

March 05, 2013  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

Here's your glimpse into a secret masculine world: The men's room at Mitchum's Steakhouse has a picture of Marilyn Monroe in it.

March 05, 2013  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

That's an interesting list. I haven't heard of all the authors, but I hear good things about the ones I know. And I think I have a copy of Laura lying around the house.

March 05, 2013  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

I forgot to mention that I downloaded No Good From a Corpse ($1.99 for Kindle) after I watched the movie. I've read about a quarter of it so far. It's worth reading.

March 05, 2013  
Blogger Roman Noir said...

Thanks for the hot tip about downloading "No Good From a Corpse"! After you read "Mother Finds a Body", I recommend "In a Lonely Place" by Dorthy Hughes. It's very different from the Bogie movie and it reminded me of of the Ripley books (although I believe Lonely Place was first). It had great lines like "desiccated old hag"...
I'm still on the look out for Ann Petry's "The Street".

March 05, 2013  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

I finished reading the book last night, and I'l try to put up a post about it in the next day or two. It's hell of a book, and it deserves to be better known. It also shares some traits with El Dorado and, though its protagonist is a man, Brackett gives him at least one observation that a man is unlikely to make (the effect is amusing.)

I was also pleased that I recognized the epigraph from the Hávamál that gives the novel its title.

And thank for the recommendations.

March 06, 2013  

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