Tuesday, October 28, 2008

Noir at the Bar with Jonathan Maberry this Sunday, Nov. 2

Jonathan Maberry, Stoker Award-winning author of Ghost Road Blues, Zombie CSU: The Forensics of the Living Dead and many more, will read from his new novel Patient Zero this Sunday, Nov. 2, at Philadelphia's fifth Noir at the Bar reading.

"Jonathan Maberry writes in the grand poetic horror tradition of Poe and Robert McCammon."

– MWA grandmaster Stuart Kaminsky

"Every so often, you discover an author whose writing is so lyrical that it transcends mere storytelling. Jonathan Maberry is just such an author, and his writing is powerful enough to sing with poetry while simultaneously scaring the hell out of you."

– Best-selling author Tess Gerritsen

"A hell of a nice guy with a razor-sharp mind who will make you think about zombies in ways you have never done before."

– Detectives Beyond Borders' Peter Rozovsky
================================

Where: Tritone
1508 South Street
Philadelphia, PA
215–545–0475
http://www.tritonebar.com/

When: Sunday, Nov. 2, 6:00 p.m.

"Noir at the Bar: A Philadelphia Tradition Since 2008"

© Peter Rozovsky 2008

Labels: ,

13 Comments:

Blogger adrian mckinty said...

Beard War

October 28, 2008  
Blogger angie said...

So are you gonna record this one for posterity? Inquiring minds wanna know!

October 28, 2008  
Blogger petra michelle; Whose role is it anyway? said...

Quite a bit of cultural action in your neck of the woods, Peter. Always enjoy reading your posts,
irrespective of whether I have anything relevant to say or offer.

October 28, 2008  
Anonymous marco said...

You mean zombies aren't Canadians in disguise?

My v word says press,and I obey.

October 28, 2008  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

Marco, let me check with the prime minister of Canada on that one and see what he wants me to say.

V-word coldeste, which really should be reserved for Donna Moore and her recent psots from Alaska.

October 28, 2008  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

"adrian mckinty said...
Beard War"


In recent days I have been looking in the mirror and realizing that I may soon finally live up to Arlene Hunt's, er, compliment. So the beard may come off. But don't tell Arlene.

But the dichotomy between bearded and clean-shaven is such a Western thing. Just as Shiva's dance of destruction allows for the world to be created again, so shaving allows a new beard to begin. Could Shiva and shave derive from the same root?

October 28, 2008  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

Thanks, PM. Your books are in the mail. (For those who read this, the books are not a bribe in return for Petra Michelle's kind words. She's paying for the books.)

October 28, 2008  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

Angie, I probably won't record this one. I've had much on my mind since Bouchercon and have not had time to follow up on our technical discussion. But I should have ample time for shopping and investigating recorders and microphones before the next Noir at the Bar, scheduled for December 7.

October 28, 2008  
Blogger adrian mckinty said...

A basic etymological check reveals that Shiva and shave are from the same ur Indo European root "seev" meaning death. Among proto Indo Europeans only the bearded could get into their chilly paradise full of mammoths, tame sabertooth tigers and lame, easy to club buffalo. Shave at your peril, the Indian god of destruction is an angry god, not easily mocked, his punishments are often swift and unexpect-

October 28, 2008  
Blogger petra michelle; Whose role is it anyway? said...

hahaha, Peter! Yes, always on the up and up!

p.s. You're right. I noticed how long they're getting and decided to cut back. Just don't have the time to keep up that pace.

October 28, 2008  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

Is it true, then, that the invocation "Shaiva nahair cutoo bitz" really originates in the Rig Veda?

October 29, 2008  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

Nah, don't worry about it, Petra. You're just getting more ambitious artistically. Pretty soon you'll be making sequences of three psots and calling them trilogies.

October 29, 2008  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

Adrian:

"Shave at your peril, the Indian god of destruction is an angry god, not easily mocked, his punishments are often swift and unexpect-"

I entered a six-word-story competition at a crime-fiction Web site some time ago with a British-flavored tale that I will now give the title:

The Insistent Barkeep

"Time, gentlemen, please!"

"But I'm not – "

=========================

Punch line: A woman comes up to me at Bouchercon, hands me a printout of the story, and asks me to autograph it. Turns out she had looked at the attendees list and planned to get as many of the contest entries as possible signed by their authors. I was gobsmacked, and not for one second did I think I was being stalked by a psychotic fan,

October 31, 2008  

Post a Comment

Links to this post:

Create a Link

<< Home