Wednesday, July 09, 2008

Things aren't always what they meme, Part II

Oh, all right: Peter Lovesey. Declan Burke. John McFetridge. Megan Abbott. Scott Phillips. Christa Faust.

As before, how about you? Who would you miss the most if they stopped writing?

© Peter Rozovsky 2008

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11 Comments:

Blogger Kerrie said...

That's cheating - you've named 9 altogether. My choices were Peter Lovesey, Michael Robotham and Ruth Rendell, but choosing was very hard

July 09, 2008  
Blogger The Clandestine Samurai said...

Chuck Palahniuk!! I would say Paul Auster, but I've only read one of his books ("Travels In The Scriptorium"). Other than that, most of the authors I read are dead.

July 09, 2008  
Blogger John McFetridge said...

All right, I take you up on your challenge!

But I'll tell you right now, it can't be narrowed down to three.

And thanks for all the kind words about my bookson your blog.

Was it perhaps the keyboard player in the Steven Barry Blues Band you knew?

July 09, 2008  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

John: Thanks for accepting the challenge. I'll be interested to find out whom you pick, and perhaps that will lead me into speculations about influences on your own writing, especially if you choose someone other than Elmore Leonard. You're welcome for the kind words. They are well deserved, of course.

Three is an absurdly small number for a challenge like this, as you'll note from Kerrie's comment. I'd say that few readers will show the iron discipline she did in following the instructions to the letter and hammering, slicing and excising her list down to three.

I knew a guy who wound up playing keyboards for Men Without Hats. I'm not sure he ever recorded with them, but he played with them in concert. A friend of mine from Snowdon knew Ivan and Stefan Doroschuk when all were hockey-playing youngsters, so all my "connections" are to Men Without Hats. I had not read or heard the name Steven Barry Blues Band in years, and reading it was a nostalgic jolt. The funny thing is, I can't remember where I saw them play, though I do have a hazy recollection that they were somebody's opening act. I can't remember who the headliner was. Could it have been someone as off-beat as the jazz bassist Jaco Pastorious?

July 09, 2008  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

Kerrie, my excuses for cheating would be that others did the same and that since the question was difficult and arguably ambiguous, I ought to be permitted a but of cheating. Or maybe I'm just a lot lazier than you are.

July 09, 2008  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

Chuck Palahniuk seems to be the kind of author the question was designed for: Early enough in his career that one can still expect a steady output of books and be disappointed if that output is not forthcoming.

July 09, 2008  
Blogger Uriah Robinson said...

Andrea Camilleri, Jo Nesbo and Carlo Lucarelli or Peter Robinson. But it is an impossible choice to make.

July 09, 2008  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

It is an impossible choice, though I could have guessed at least one of yours. Hmm, perhaps I should get off my duff and read some Peter Robinson.

July 09, 2008  
Blogger John McFetridge said...

Men Without Hats - I saw them live a few times, once in NDG at Sunday in the Park (I lived at the corner of Sherbrooke and Old Orchard), what a great live band.

I still have the self-titled Jaco Pastorious album and a few Weather Report when he was with them; Black Market, Heavy Weeather and Mr. Gone. Wow, haven't listened to them in a while, I think I will now.

Men Without Hats deserve to be known for more than just Safety Dance.

Isn't Ivan primarily a poet now?

July 09, 2008  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

If you saw them live, you may have seen my old high school pal Lenny pounding on a piano. It also probably means that you were in Montreal longer than I was. I think I’d more or less left Canada by the time Men Without Hats hit. I know I never saw them live, and I have no idea what those they're up to now.

It's always -- well, sometimes -- interesting to wonder idly about the fate of one-hit wonders. And, whether or not Men Without Hats deserves to be known for more than just their one hit, that one hit was a hell of an amiably silly, danceable song.

Now you've got me thinking about the time I saw Offenbach backing Chuck Berry, who got pissed and walked off stage after about a song and a half.

July 09, 2008  
Blogger Peter Rozovsky said...

Yep, he turns up here, as a member of Men Without Hats' 1985 live band: Lenny "the Pinster" Pinkas.

July 09, 2008  

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