Saturday, September 08, 2007

Sister Fidelma goes to school: Crime fiction in the classroom

There are female sleuths and historical sleuths and lots and lots of historical female sleuths, and a group of educators has the novel idea that the latter belong in the curriculum.

The Women in World History Curriculum's Web site will gladden the hearts of crime-fiction readers everywhere with its defense of crime fiction as a teaching tool. It also offers short reviews of more than 90 crime novels with female protagonists. The settings range from ancient Egypt to 1947 Pennsylvania and contemporary Botswana.

© Peter Rozovsky 2007

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8 Comments:

Blogger Linkmeister said...

Their premise seems sensible to me, but how could they leave Amelia Peabody out of the late-19th to early-20th century Egypt section?

There are some new-to-me books listed there, so that's another resource, thanks.

September 08, 2007  
Blogger Peter said...

There is an Amelia Peabody mystery on the list: http://www.womeninworldhistory.com/mystery-11.html. It's listed under ancient Egypt, which is a bit confusing, though understandable.

You're welcome. Lots of the books are new to me, so I was pleased to find the list. The notes that accompany the discussions of each book are helpful, too, some with suggestions for further reading, as one would expect from teachers.

September 08, 2007  
Blogger sally906 said...

What a find - my TBR list has just grown by a whole page :)

September 09, 2007  
Blogger Peter said...

I know you're big on reading challenges, that you can't resist a list, and that's quite a list.

I came to it through my reading of Absolution By Murder, the first Sister Fidelma book, and I may use it a resource in one of the ways that the list's compilers suggest: a painless way of learning history.

Actually, I'm enjoying Absolution By Murder in part because I knew a bit -- and not much more -- about that period. I might use the list as a way to add a bit of detail and color to periods of history about which I know something already. I hope all such books will be as good on detail as is Peter Tremayne's.

September 09, 2007  
Blogger Linkmeister said...

Rats. I missed it. I wouldn't have picked the one they did, since it's got Ramses as principal, not Amelia, but whadda I know?

They could branch out into future mysteries with women protagonists and add one of the in Death books, too. (I own all of those and have just now re-started my way through, after stopping following the fourth or fifth one for a month or so. That's undoubtedly why they spring to mind.)

September 09, 2007  
Blogger Peter said...

I don't know if books set in the future would fit their criteria. Theirs is a history list, designed to supplement teaching of history. Perhaps that's why they included among the Amelia Peabody books one with a historical figure as principal

Of course, you could still make your own future-mystery-with-female-protagonist list.

September 09, 2007  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Women in history should be discussed on women's forum:)

December 26, 2007  
Blogger Peter said...

When the discussion touches on crime fiction, I may join in!

December 26, 2007  

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